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Automatic Transmission Frequently Asked Questions


We try to anticipate questions you might have about our PRODUCT / SERVICE and provide the answers here. If you need additional information send email to YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.
1.

What Do I Need To Know About Today's Automatic Transaxles And Transmissions?

Today’s car and truck automatic transmissions are the most complicated and least understood major component. In later model car and truck transmissions use a combination of sophisticated hydraulics and computer controlled parts and components. Front wheel drive automatic transmission car and trucks incorporate the third major component the differential. Front wheel drive automatic transmissions are known as transaxles. The differential or final drive is incorporated in the body of the automatic transmission itself. Front wheel drive automatic transmissions configuration is efficient in terms of fuel economy, handling and manufacturing costs, however, with the additional parts and components housed within the transaxle unit, when it fails, it is generally more expensive to repair. An automatic transmission / transaxle properly rebuilt can deliver longevity equal to or in excess of your car or trucks original transmission / transaxle.

For cars and trucks used in severe driving conditions, there are additional precautions which can be taken to insure against premature transmission / transaxle failure and make a car or truck better able to deliver the performance the driver wants in these unusual driving conditions. Some severe driving conditions include heavy city, stop and go driving, regular mountainous driving, pulling heavy loads, unusually warm climate, and trailer towing. Under these severe conditions it may be advisable to install a transmission external cooler or updated valve body shift kit.

If you subject your car or truck to these types of driving conditions, please feel free to contact the transmission specialist at Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive, they will be pleased to make the appropriate recommendations to insure that your car or trucks automatic transmission / transaxle meets all your needs and wants.


1.

What Are Normal Driving Conditions For An Automatic Transmission?

Car and trucks that are usually driven occasionally or for short distance trips are often subjected to unusual wear and strain to the automatic transmission. Not only do driving conditions affect the automatic transmission but the brakes, engine, etc. Cars and trucks that are consistently driven short distances never have the opportunity for the engine to warm up to normal operating temperature. This can cause excessive wear on the engine. Low mileage automatic transmissions subjected to city driving or stop and go driving usually experience far more wear than automatic transmissions with the same number of highway miles. The highway mileage doesn’t create as much wear and tear on the automatic transmission. Highway miles are easier on the automatic transmission as the number of times the automatic transmission shifts up and down through its gear ranges is far less then stop and go driving.

Some other seemingly normal driving conditions can affect the automatic transmissions life span. Conditions such as extreme hot or cold temperatures, snowy roads, icy roads, mountainous terrain, dusty terrain and poor air quality can drastically affect the life of the automatic transmission.

Under normal driving conditions, automobile manufacturers recommend servicing the automatic transmission fluid as seldom as every 20,000 to 100,000 miles. But the question is what constitutes normal driving conditions?

According to most automobile manufactures normal driving conditions of automatic transmissions can range, but most agree that the following conditions are considered normal. Driving about 12,000 to 15,000 miles per year. Keeping the engine and transmission operating at normal operating temperature most of the time. A driving mix of about 1/3 city driving and 2/3 highway driving. Outside temperature usually moderate; not too hot or too cold. Roadways dry, straight, occasional, moderate hills or valleys. Air quality moderate and clean. No excessive speeding, drag racing, jackrabbit starts, hard braking or quick shifting. Light to moderate loads; one or two passengers, with very little weight added to the trunk or cargo space. Tire pressures set properly and all fluids at correct levels and condition.

If you operate your automobile under more extreme driving conditions as most people do you’ll want to reduce the time and mileage between automatic transmission fluid change maintenance services. Having your automatic transmission serviced once a year, or at very least every other year, seems to be the consensus among transmission repair professionals. Under the most extreme driving conditions, it is advisable to install an external transmission filter and external transmission cooler for additional protection.

If you’re not sure when the last time your automatic transmission fluid was changed, just bring your car or truck into Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive in San Antonio, TX for a Free Transmission Fluid Evaluation and FREE Transmission Performance Check.


1.

What Winter Hazards Affect My Automatic Transmission?

Winter conditions vary geographically, but there are a few conditions that are common to most of the United States during the winter months. How you deal with those winter conditions can have a dramatic effect on your automatic transmission. Cold temperatures means cold weather and as temperatures drop, automatic transmission fluid thickens reducing their ability to lubricate. In most of the United States you can deal with this simply by warm up your car or truck for 5 to 10 minutes depending how cold it is. Also driving slowly for the first few miles until the engine and transmission reach normal operating temperature. Automatic transmission fluid doesn’t start flowing through the transmission cooler lines until you put the transmission shifter into drive.

If the temperature tends to get really cold in your area, invest in an engine heater that plugs into a wall outlet and warms the engine before you come out in the morning. A timer will allow you to start the engine warming a few hours before you’re ready to leave and saving you money. For much of the country driving on snow and ice is part of a normal winter.

But there are specific hazards to your automatic transmission on those roadways. One that you may not be familiar with is what can happen if you get stuck. Too often drivers spin their wheels in the hopes of freeing themselves from a snow drift or icy patch. This can cause major damage to the transmission. Today’s automobile uses a computer to control automatic transmission operation. When you spin the wheels the computer sees the vehicle speed rising; in many cases it has no way of knowing that you aren’t really moving. When the speedometer registers 40-or-so MPH, the computer sees the speed, and identifies driving conditions as being right to engage the converter clutch. Now the engine is locked directly to the drive wheels. If the wheels regain traction, their speed will drop suddenly. The result can be catastrophic to the automatic transmission. The best way to get out of a drift or icy patch is to rock the car back and forth, forward and reverse until you can get moving again. Or, better yet, get someone to push or pull you out of the snow. Avoid spinning the wheels, or you could end up damaging the automatic transmission.

No major component of your vehicle can survive indefinitely with water in its internal components. But no other component can be damaged as quickly as your automatic transmission can by water. Even a small amount of water in an automatic transmission almost always results in serious failure and major repair bills. The reason is the band and clutch linings are hygroscopic; that is, they absorb water, even if they have to push transmission fluid out of the linings to do it. This water quickly finds its way down to the metal backings, causing them to rust and lift the linings off of the clutches and bands. The result is metal to metal contact, which always means serious damage to the transmission. To avoid this type of trouble, steer clear of deep puddles. Should you find your automobile submerged, don’t start the engine. Your only chance of avoiding a big repair bill is to have your automobile towed into a transmission repair shop and have all the transmission drained out or flushed out immediately. If you're lucky, draining and servicing the transmission fluid and filter may be all that’s necessary to save it. If not, your auto insurance may cover part or all of the damage. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive will be happy to supply the necessary technical information to your insurance company.

So whether it’s snow and ice, water, or just plain cold out, winter delivers a whole new set of conditions just waiting to damage your automatic transmission.


1.

Which Transmission Is More Energy Efficient An Automatic Or Manual?

Hydraulic automatic transmissions are almost always less energy efficient than manual transmissions due mainly to viscous and pumping losses; both in the torque converter and the hydraulic actuators. A relatively small amount of energy is required to pressurize the hydraulic control system, which uses fluid pressure to determine the correct shifting patterns and operate the various automatic clutch mechanisms.

Manual transmissions use a mechanical clutch to transmit torque, rather than a torque converter, thus avoiding the primary source of loss in an automatic transmission. Manual transmissions also avoid the power requirement of the hydraulic control system, by relying on the human muscle power of the vehicle operator to disengage the clutch and actuate the gear levers, and the mental power of the operator to make appropriate gear ratio selections. Thus the manual transmission requires very little engine power to function, with the main power consumption due to drag from the gear train being immersed in the lubricating oil of the gearbox.

The energy efficiency of automatic transmission has increased with the introduction of the torque converter lock-up clutch, which practically eliminates fluid losses when engaged. Modern automatic transmission also minimize energy usage and complexity, by minimizing the amount of shifting logic that is done hydraulically. Typically, control of the transmission has been transferred to computerized control systems which do not use fluid pressure for shift logic or actuation of clutching mechanisms.

The on road acceleration of an automatic transmission can occasionally exceed that of an otherwise identical vehicle equipped with a manual transmission in turbocharged diesel applications. Turbo-boost is normally lost between gear changes in a manual whereas in an automatic the accelerator pedal can remain fully depressed. This however is still largely dependent upon the number and optimal spacing of gear ratios for each unit, and whether or not the elimination of spool down / accelerator lift off represent a significant enough gain to counter the slightly higher power consumption of the automatic transmission itself.


1.

What Is Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF)?

Automatic transmission fluid is a hydraulic and lubricating oil. This component of the automatic transmission provides lubrication, corrosion prevention, and a hydraulic medium to convey mechanical power. Primarily made from refined petroleum and processed to provide properties that promote smooth power automatic transmission and increase service life, the automatic transmission fluid is one of the few parts of the automatic transmission that needs routine service as the vehicle ages. Sergeant Clutch recommends changing the automatic transmission fluid every 12,000 miles or ever 12 months.


1.

What Are The Different Automatic Transmission Fluid Types?

Here’s a list of the different types of automatic transmission fluids and the basic differences between them:

1. Type F Automatic Transmission Fluid: Almost no automatic transmission uses Type F anymore. Type F was designed for Ford transmissions that used bronze clutches. The last automatic transmission made with bronze clutches was the Cruiseomatic, last used in the early ‘70s. Unless you’re talking about a classic car or an antique, you can be pretty sure your automatic transmission doesn’t use Type F.

2. Dexron III / Mercon Automatic Transmission Fluid: This is one of the most common automatic transmission fluids on the market. Most GM transmissions and Ford transmissions, as well as many import transmissions, use this type of ATF. If your vehicles owners manual recommends any form of Dexron or Mercon other than Mercon V this is the transmission fluid you want to use.

3. HFM-Style Automatic Transmission Fluids: HFM stands for Highly Friction Modified; it’s an automatic transmission fluid that provides different friction characteristics than Dexron III / Mercon. This transmission fluid appears under a number of different names, including Chrysler’s ATF+ also called 7670. Many other manufacturers use HFM ATF these include: Honda Transmissions, Acura Transmissions, Jeep Transmissions, Eagle Transmissions. Hyundai Transmissions, Toyota Transmissions, Lexus Transmissions, Saturn Transmissions and Sterling Transmissions.

Are HFM fluids interchangeable?

They should be. But to be safe, always use the specific transmission fluid the vehicles manufacturer calls for.

4. Automatic Synthetic Transmission Fluids: A number of automobile manufacturers have begun to discontinue the use of organically based transmission fluids in favor of synthetic transmission fluids. Preliminary tests have shown that most synthetics have similar friction modification characteristics to Dexron III/Mercon transmission fluid, but with improved resistance to heat, cold, oxidation, sheer and synthetic fluid last longer.

Automatic synthetic transmission fluid is one reason why many automobile manufacturers begin to eliminate the automatic transmission dipstick. Manufacturers feel synthetic transmission fluid will last longer, so there’s no reason to let people interfere with the automatic transmission and its operation.

Caution Ford labels their automatic synthetic transmission fluid as Mercon V, which can be a bit confusing. If the vehicles owner manual says Mercon V, it’s calling for the synthetic transmission fluid. If the name is Mercon without the V, that’s the regular Dexron III/Mercon transmission fluid.

Still not sure which fluid you need? Stop by Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive and our transmission mechanic will be happy to check your vehicles transmission fluid. Call today to schedule an appointment 210-239-1600 or visit us at 6557 Walzem Rd. San Antonio, Texas 78239.

Are you experiencing loss of power upon acceleration? Is your automatic transmission unable to go into gear? Is your automatic transmission not shifting? Is your automatic transmission shifting hard or sifting late? Is your automatic transmission slipping? Is you automatic transmission making a chatter or grinding noise? Is your automatic transmission leaking fluid? Is your car or truck not drivable? Are you in or around San Antonio, Texas?

With over 60 Years Experience in the Auto Repair, Clutch Repair and Transmission Repair Industry Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop is "The Automatic Transmission Specialist" in San Antonio, Texas. Sergeant Clutch has the Expert Knowledge, Products and High Tech Technology to Service and Repair your Car or Truck right the first time at the right price.


1.

What Type of Automatic Transmission Fluid Should I Use?

Automatic transmissions use a special type of oil, called Automatic Transmission Fluid, or ATF. This fluid has a number of duties in the automatic transmission, including lubrication, cooling and clutch application. Automatic transmission fluid provides the connection between the engine and transmission, through a hydraulic coupling called a torque converter. And, when squeezed between the clutches, automatic transmission fluid acts as a “glue,” providing additional friction and holding capacity to drive the car or truck. So automatic transmission fluid is a very versatile fluid. That’s why maintaining the transmission fluid can be so critical to an automatic transmission life.

Just a few years ago there were only two types of automatic transmission fluid on the market Type A and Type F. Conventional wisdom said that Type F transmission fluid was for all Ford transmissions and Type A was for all other transmissions. Conventional wisdom wasn’t all that accurate even back then. These days there are four main types of automatic transmission fluids on the market. And there are dozens of brands and styles to choose from. There are many different types of transmission fluid on the market, and using the wrong type can affect your automatic transmission’s performance and longevity.

So how do you know what type of transmission fluid your car or truck uses? The easiest way to make sure you’re using the right type of automatic transmission fluid is to check the vehicles owner’s manual. It’ll tell you exactly which Transmission Fluid the manufacturer recommends for your car or truck. May times on the transmission dipstick will indicate what type of ATF to use.

Automatic Transmission Fluid Types

Here’s a list of the different types of automatic transmission fluids and the basic differences between them:

1. Type F Automatic Transmission Fluid: Almost no automatic transmission uses Type F anymore. Type F was designed for Ford transmissions that used bronze clutches. The last automatic transmission made with bronze clutches was the Cruiseomatic, last used in the early ‘70s. Unless you’re talking about a classic car or an antique, you can be pretty sure your automatic transmission doesn’t use Type F.

2. Dexron III / Mercon Automatic Transmission Fluid: This is one of the most common automatic transmission fluids on the market. Most GM transmissions and Ford transmissions, as well as many import transmissions, use this type of ATF. If your vehicles owners manual recommends any form of Dexron or Mercon other than Mercon V this is the transmission fluid you want to use.

3. HFM-Style Automatic Transmission Fluids: HFM stands for Highly Friction Modified; it’s an automatic transmission fluid that provides different friction characteristics than Dexron III / Mercon. This transmission fluid appears under a number of different names, including Chrysler’s ATF+ also called 7670. Many other manufacturers use HFM ATF these include: Honda Transmissions, Acura Transmissions, Jeep Transmissions, Eagle Transmissions. Hyundai Transmissions, Toyota Transmissions, Lexus Transmissions, Saturn Transmissions and Sterling Transmissions.

Are HFM fluids interchangeable?

They should be. But to be safe, always use the specific transmission fluid the vehicles manufacturer calls for.

4. Automatic Synthetic Transmission Fluids: A number of automobile manufacturers have begun to discontinue the use of organically based transmission fluids in favor of synthetic transmission fluids. Preliminary tests have shown that most synthetics have similar friction modification characteristics to Dexron III/Mercon transmission fluid, but with improved resistance to heat, cold, oxidation, sheer and synthetic fluid last longer.

Automatic synthetic transmission fluid is one reason why many automobile manufacturers begin to eliminate the automatic transmission dipstick. Manufacturers feel synthetic transmission fluid will last longer, so there’s no reason to let people interfere with the automatic transmission and its operation.

Caution Ford labels their automatic synthetic transmission fluid as Mercon V, which can be a bit confusing. If the vehicles owner manual says Mercon V, it’s calling for the synthetic transmission fluid. If the name is Mercon without the V, that’s the regular Dexron III/Mercon transmission fluid.

Still not sure which fluid you need? Stop by Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive and our transmission mechanic will be happy to check your vehicles transmission fluid. Call today to schedule an appointment 210-239-1600 or visit us at 6557 Walzem Rd. San Antonio, Texas 78239.


1.

What Are 4 Basic Transmission Fluid Conditions?

1. Clean, Clear Fluid, with Virtually No Odor: The transmission fluid is like new. Chances are the automatic transmission’s working fine. Use the vehicle mileage or time since it was last serviced to determine whether you should have the transmission serviced.

2. Slight Brownish Tint, with a Lightly Burnt Odor: The transmission fluid is beginning to burn, and is probably due for a transmission fluid service. If you didn’t have the transmission fluid flushed completely the last time you had the transmission serviced, you may just be looking at the old transmission fluid that was left in the transmission. As long as the transmission seems to be working okay, consider a complete transmission fluid flush service in the not-too-distant future.

3. Brown Color, with a Distinctly Burnt or Varnished Odor: The transmission fluid is burnt, and you may already be experiencing transmission operating problems. If the transmission seems to be operating okay, you might still get away with a complete fluid flush service and transmission filter replacement. But there’s little doubt that the transmission is beginning to wear, so the best you can expect from a transmission fluid service is to buy some time. Eventually you’ll be facing a transmission repair job.

4. Black Color, with a Stench that Will Make Your Toes Curl: The transmission fluid is severely burnt, and the transmission probably is, too. You’re probably experiencing a serious transmission problem. A transmission fluid service at this point will usually be a complete waste of money; the transmission is going to need a major overhaul or rebuild. And there’s the possibility of related problems, such as a clogged transmission cooler or a cooling system problem. Make sure you have these systems checked at the same time, to avoid a second transmission failure.

Of course transmission fluid condition isn’t the only thing mechanics check when examining a transmission’s condition. They also look at operating condition, computer system codes, and any loose material in the pan, to name just a few. Automatic transmission fluid condition is just one of a series of signs used to diagnose transmission problems.

If you’re unsure of whether your automatic transmission fluid indicates a problem, stop by Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive at 6557 Walzem Road in San Antonio, Texas 78239 or call us 210-239-1600.

Are you experiencing loss of power upon acceleration? Is your automatic transmission unable to go into gear? Is your automatic transmission not shifting? Is your automatic transmission shifting hard or sifting late? Is your automatic transmission slipping? Is you automatic transmission making a chatter or grinding noise? Is your automatic transmission leaking fluid? Is your car or truck not drivable? Are you in or around San Antonio, Texas?

With over 60 Years Experience in the Auto Repair, Clutch Repair and Transmission Repair Industry Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop is "The Automatic Transmission Specialist" in San Antonio, Texas. Sergeant Clutch has the Expert Knowledge, Products and High Tech Technology to Service and Repair your Car or Truck right the first time at the right price.


1.

How Do I Check The Automatic Transmission Fluid Level?

Automatic transmissions operate on oil, properly called automatic transmission fluid, or ATF for short. Low transmission fluid levels can have a disastrous effect on the automatic transmission operation. In recent years many automobile manufacturers have started to eliminate the automatic transmission fluid dipstick. These transmissions are called sealed units. Automatic transmissions that are considered sealed units require a much more involved process to check the automatic transmission fluid level. The process of checking the transmission fluid level in a sealed transmission often involves computer diagnostic testing. This puts checking the automatic transmission fluid level beyond the capabilities of the average car driver. If your car or truck transmission doesn’t have a dipstick, you should bring your vehicle by Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive for a FREE Transmission Fluid Level Check.

The best time to have the transmission fluid level checked is at every motor oil change. However if your vehicle doesn’t have a transmission dipstick, you should at least check the transmission fluid level every other motor oil change. The vehicles owners manual should provide a detailed procedure for checking the automatic transmission fluid level.

Sergeant Clutch 12 Step Procedure To Check Your Automatic Transmission Fluid Level

1. Make sure your automobile is on level ground.

2. Start the engine and leave running.

3. Bring the engine and transmission to normal operating temperature.

4. Hold your foot on the brake, and work the transmission shifter slowly through all the gears.

5. Put the transmission shifter back into park.

6. Set the parking brake.

7. Carefully open and secure the hood.

8. Locate the transmission dipstick the vehicles owners manual should show where the transmission dipstick is located.

9. Remove the transmission dipstick and wipe it off with a clean rag or paper towel.

10. Replace the transmission dipstick all the way back down into the transmission fill tube.

11. Pull the transmission dipstick back out and check the transmission fluid level against the markings on the end of the dipstick.

12. If the transmission fluid level is below the full line on the dipstick add the necessary transmission fluid.

Important Note: Always use the recommended transmission fluid by the manufacturer.

If the transmission requires more than a quart of fluid or is using transmission fluid regularly, take your vehicle in to have the transmission checked for leaks. Front wheel drive transmissions usually have the dipstick on the driver’s side of the vehicle, on either side of the transmission. Rear wheel drive transmissions usually have the dipstick on the passenger’s side of the engine compartment near the back of the engine. Checking the automatic transmission fluid level requires working under the hood of your vehicle with the engine is running. Checking the transmission fluid can be very dangerous if you aren’t sure what you’re doing. Use caution and watch out for moving parts and components such as fan blades, fan belts, pulleys, etc.

With over 60 Years Experience in the Auto Repair, Clutch Repair and Transmission Repair Industry Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop is "The Automatic Transmission Specialist" in San Antonio, Texas. Sergeant Clutch has the Expert Knowledge, Products and High Tech Technology to Service and Repair your Car or Truck right the first time at the right price.


1.

Do Automatic Transmission Fluid Additives Really Work?

Any auto parts store will have an isle dedicated to automatic transmission fluid additives and transmission fix in a can you can imagine. These products have labels that offer promises from simply making your transmission last longer, stop leak and all the way up to a transmission rebuild in a can. Many of these products don’t work. However there are a few products that really do work. These products usually won’t be at your local auto parts store. Many professional auto repair and transmission shops have access to these products. The professional products offered by professional transmission repair shops tend to make more realistic claims, such as neutralize acids that build up in the transmission fluid, provide additional resistance to the effects of heat, prevent or reverse fluid oxidation, prevent or reverse fluid sheer, modify friction characteristics to improve transmission performance, provide additional lubrication to moving parts, soften and remove varnish from internal transmission parts and components. These transmission fluid additives have the advantage of being able to deliver on their promises.

In today’s transmission industry there are many different types of automatic transmission fluid (ATF) on the market. Several aftermarket chemical companies have come up with a formula to save auto repair shops and automobile owners money. These companies have developed special additives that mix with standard Dexron III transmission fluid and Mercon transmission fluid, to alter the friction characteristics to match special OEM type fluids. One of the most common of these special additives is the HFM additive. When HFM is added to Dexron III transmission fluid or Mercon transmission fluid, it alters the friction characteristics enough to allow it to be used in any transmission that requires HFM fluids.

If you have your automatic transmission rebuilt or the automatic transmission fluid replaced, the auto repair shop may use Dexron III transmission fluid or Mercon transmission fluid along with one of the HFM additives. That’s okay; these transmission fluid additives work great for altering the transmission fluid’s friction characteristics. However, if your transmission is still within its factory warranty, check with the dealer or a factory representative before allowing anything in your transmission besides the factory recommended automatic transmission fluid (ATF). Certain transmission fluid additives or oils could affect your factory warranty.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive has a selection of great working transmission fluid additives available. So please do not waste your money on transmission fluid additives and transmission fix in a can that claim to offer a “new transmission in a can.” Check with Sergeant Clutch for information on transmission fluid additives that really work as advertised.

Are you experiencing loss of power upon acceleration? Is your automatic transmission unable to go into gear? Is your automatic transmission not shifting? Is your automatic transmission shifting hard or sifting late? Is your automatic transmission slipping? Is you automatic transmission making a chatter or grinding noise? Is your automatic transmission leaking fluid? Is your car or truck not drivable? Are you in or around San Antonio, Texas?

With over 60 Years Experience in the Auto Repair, Clutch Repair and Transmission Repair Industry Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop is "The Automatic Transmission Specialist" in San Antonio, Texas. Sergeant Clutch has the Expert Knowledge, Products and High Tech Technology to Service and Repair your Car or Truck right the first time at the right price.


1.

Will Servicing My Automatic Transmission Help It Last Longer?

Yes servicing your car or trucks automatic transmission regularly can dramatically extend its life and enhance it performance. That’s because the automatic transmission fluid or ATF does more than just lubricate and cool the transmission: It also helps drive it. Damage to the automatic transmission fluid, such as oxidation and shear, will reduce the transmissions holding power and life. Old worn out transmission fluid allows the automatic transmission to slip, overheat and can quickly cause it to fail. To keep your automatic transmission working longer, you should have it serviced regularly. A complete transmission service should include: removing and examining the transmission oil pan (where possible), replacing or cleaning the transmission screen or filter, cleaning the transmission oil pan, reinstalling the transmission oil pan with a new pan gasket, pumping out the rest of the old transmission fluid and replacing it with new, high quality ATF, adding a friction modifier or transmission fluid additive package.

Regular transmission fluid services will add miles and years to your automatic transmission’s life. Adding an external transmission filter to the cooler line to remove any dirt particles that make it past the internal filter is a great investment, Also adding an external transmission cooler has many benefits. A complete transmission filter and fluid exchange service, performed annually, can add years to your automatic transmission’s life.

Are you experiencing loss of power upon acceleration? Is your automatic transmission unable to go into gear? Is your automatic transmission not shifting? Is your automatic transmission shifting hard or sifting late? Is your automatic transmission slipping? Is you automatic transmission making a chatter or grinding noise? Is your automatic transmission leaking fluid? Is your car or truck not drivable? Are you in or around San Antonio, Texas?

With over 60 Years Experience in the Auto Repair, Clutch Repair and Transmission Repair Industry Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop is "The Automatic Transmission Specialist" in San Antonio, Texas. Sergeant Clutch has the Expert Knowledge, Products and High Tech Technology to Service and Repair your Car or Truck right the first time at the right price.


1.

Did You Know Changing Your Automatic Transmission Fluid Saves You Time & Money?

Today’s automatic transmission fluid is much more complex and high tech. Automatic transmission fluid is more than just a lubricate. Transmission fluid helps the automatic transmission move and operate properly. Any wear or damage to the automatic transmission fluid, such as oxidation will reduce the transmissions holding power, creating transmission shifting problems, transmission overheating, and internal transmission part failure. By regularly changing the automatic transmission fluid in you car or truck will dramatically extend the life of your automatic transmission. A simple transmission fluid change or transmission fluid flush annually can add many years to the life of your car or trucks transmission. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive offers several transmission preventive maintenance services.

With over 60 Years Experience in the Auto Repair, Clutch Repair and Transmission Repair Industry Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop is "The Automatic Transmission Specialist" in San Antonio, Texas. Sergeant Clutch has the Expert Knowledge, Products and High Tech Technology to Service and Repair your Car or Truck right the first time at the right price.